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Listing May - 2020
 
  Sunday
May-31
The following story is shared by Fr.Tom Cahill and its a story called 'The Deep End'

This story tells what Pentecost is about. A taxi driver arrives at an address. He honks his horn. No response. He honks again. Still no response. Out he gets and knocks on the door. A stressed voice cries out, "Just a minute, please." After a long pause he hears something being dragged to the door. A frail old woman in her 80's opens the door pulling a suitcase after her. "Would you carry my case to the car, please?" she asks. "Sure," he says, and as he moves off she links his free arm and walks slowly with him to the taxi.

She gives him an address and asks him to go through the city centre. "It's not the shortest way, Ma'am," he says to her. "I don't mind," she replies, "I'm going to a hospice. There's no hurry." He looks in the rear-view mirror, and sees tears in her eyes as she reveals, "I've no family left. The doctor says I haven't long to go." As she says that the driver leans over and quietly switches off the metre.

They drive around the city centre. She points out where she had worked in an insurance office, where she and her husband had lived after their wedding, and a building that once was a ballroom where she had first met him. At one or two places they stop in silence - her mind elsewhere. Much later they reach the hospice.

The taxi driver goes home lost in thought, convinced and content that he has just had one of the most important days of his life. Pentecost means using the language of love.
 
 
 
  Saturday
May-30
Thought For The Week

'I realized that there were occasions when I needed to be able to learn to be alongside people, without being able to do anything that would make them better or happier. There are times when presence is all you have to offer.' ~Angela Tilby

One day a small boy was trying to lift a heavy stone, but he couldn't budge it. His father passing by stopped to watch his son's efforts. Finally he said to his son: "Are you using all your strength?" Exasperated, the boy cried, "Yes I am." "No you're not," said the father calmly, "You haven't asked me to help you."

Sometimes we try and deal with problems and worries all by our self. It's not an easy thing to do and nearly always an impossible task. But with the help of someone it can become so manageable. So if there is something bothering or upsetting us this weekend it might be good to share it with someone else. Like the father in the story we might be called to be there for someone and sometimes we need to take the initiative.

Our presence can be the greatest gift to someone. Its impact often goes way beyond what we might ever think. Over the years I have come to realise more and more, that just being present to someone or to a group of people is all that really matters. On many occasions I didn't have the words and didn't know what to say but I was willing to be present and just hold the light.

This is something we can all do for each other during this current Covid-19 challenging journey. When we hold the light we are making such a difference. We may not feel the difference, but others most certainly do. Our prayer this today is thanking God for the gift of presence and the difference it makes. We also ask for God's blessings, guidance and direction in everything we hope to do today and throughout the coming week.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Thursday
May-28
Thought For The Week

'I realized that there were occasions when I needed to be able to learn to be alongside people, without being able to do anything that would make them better or happier. There are times when presence is all you have to offer.' ~Angela Tilby

One day a small boy was trying to lift a heavy stone, but he couldn't budge it. His father passing by stopped to watch his son's efforts. Finally he said to his son: "Are you using all your strength?" Exasperated, the boy cried, "Yes I am." "No you're not," said the father calmly, "You haven't asked me to help you."

Sometimes we try and deal with problems and worries all by our self. It's not an easy thing to do and nearly always an impossible task. But with the help of someone it can become so manageable. So if there is something bothering or upsetting us this weekend it might be good to share it with someone else. Like the father in the story we might be called to be there for someone and sometimes we need to take the initiative.

Our presence can be the greatest gift to someone. Its impact often goes way beyond what we might ever think. Over the years I have come to realise more and more, that just being present to someone or to a group of people is all that really matters. On many occasions I didn't have the words and didn't know what to say but I was willing to be present and just hold the light.

This is something we can all do for each other during this current Covid-19 challenging journey. When we hold the light we are making such a difference. We may not feel the difference, but others most certainly do. Our prayer this today is thanking God for the gift of presence and the difference it makes. We also ask for God's blessings, guidance and direction in everything we hope to do today and throughout the coming week.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Monday
May-25
Thought For The Week

'I realized that there were occasions when I needed to be able to learn to be alongside people, without being able to do anything that would make them better or happier. There are times when presence is all you have to offer.' ~Angela Tilby

One day a small boy was trying to lift a heavy stone, but he couldn't budge it. His father passing by stopped to watch his son's efforts. Finally he said to his son: "Are you using all your strength?" Exasperated, the boy cried, "Yes I am." "No you're not," said the father calmly, "You haven't asked me to help you."

Sometimes we try and deal with problems and worries all by our self. It's not an easy thing to do and nearly always an impossible task. But with the help of someone it can become so manageable. So if there is something bothering or upsetting us this weekend it might be good to share it with someone else. Like the father in the story we might be called to be there for someone and sometimes we need to take the initiative.

Our presence can be the greatest gift to someone. Its impact often goes way beyond what we might ever think. Over the years I have come to realise more and more, that just being present to someone or to a group of people is all that really matters. On many occasions I didn't have the words and didn't know what to say but I was willing to be present and just hold the light.

This is something we can all do for each other during this current Covid-19 challenging journey. When we hold the light we are making such a difference. We may not feel the difference, but others most certainly do. Our prayer this today is thanking God for the gift of presence and the difference it makes. We also ask for God's blessings, guidance and direction in everything we hope to do today and throughout the coming week.
 
 
 
  Sunday
May-24
'Notice that all of the great liturgical prayers of the churches end with the same phrase: "through Christ our Lord, Amen." We do not pray to Christ; we pray through Christ. Or even more precisely, Christ prays through us. We are always and forever the conduits, the instruments, the tuning forks, the receiver stations. We slowly learn the right frequencies that pick up the signal of God.' ~Richard Rohr

We often talk about praying to God or praying to Jesus. Somehow if we pray hard enough our prayer flies straight to Jesus and that's all we have to do. But it is totally different to say that prayer is praying through Jesus or that Jesus prays through us. This is very comforting when we find prayer difficult or when our energy levels are low. Like a receiver, an instrument or a tuning fork, all we have to do is be open and let God work through us.

On Monday (May 18th) churches reopened as places for personal prayer (This is the current situation in Ireland). This is great news for sure. This is part of a phased plan towards being able to celebrate the sacraments with a congregation at a later date. There will be one door for entry and one for exit, with hand sanitisers on entry and exit. We know that for many people their local church is a place of comfort and solace. It is a place where they can pray be still, reflect, give thanks or light a candle.

It is also important to say that while churches may be reopening as places of personal prayer, there is no pressure whatsoever to go there for now. If you prefer to stay away for now that's absolutely fine. When we pray we can pray almost anywhere. It might be in a favourite part of your home, maybe your favourite spot in your garden or maybe it might be as you go for a walk outdoors. We believe God is present everywhere and whenever we create a prayer moment we are in a good place.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Friday
May-22
'Notice that all of the great liturgical prayers of the churches end with the same phrase: "through Christ our Lord, Amen." We do not pray to Christ; we pray through Christ. Or even more precisely, Christ prays through us. We are always and forever the conduits, the instruments, the tuning forks, the receiver stations. We slowly learn the right frequencies that pick up the signal of God.' ~Richard Rohr

We often talk about praying to God or praying to Jesus. Somehow if we pray hard enough our prayer flies straight to Jesus and that's all we have to do. But it is totally different to say that prayer is praying through Jesus or that Jesus prays through us. This is very comforting when we find prayer difficult or when our energy levels are low. Like a receiver, an instrument or a tuning fork, all we have to do is be open and let God work through us.

On Monday (May 18th) churches reopened as places for personal prayer (This is the current situation in Ireland). This is great news for sure. This is part of a phased plan towards being able to celebrate the sacraments with a congregation at a later date. There will be one door for entry and one for exit, with hand sanitisers on entry and exit. We know that for many people their local church is a place of comfort and solace. It is a place where they can pray be still, reflect, give thanks or light a candle.

It is also important to say that while churches may be reopening as places of personal prayer, there is no pressure whatsoever to go there for now. If you prefer to stay away for now that's absolutely fine. When we pray we can pray almost anywhere. It might be in a favourite part of your home, maybe your favourite spot in your garden or maybe it might be as you go for a walk outdoors. We believe God is present everywhere and whenever we create a prayer moment we are in a good place.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Thursday
May-21
'Notice that all of the great liturgical prayers of the churches end with the same phrase: "through Christ our Lord, Amen." We do not pray to Christ; we pray through Christ. Or even more precisely, Christ prays through us. We are always and forever the conduits, the instruments, the tuning forks, the receiver stations. We slowly learn the right frequencies that pick up the signal of God.' ~Richard Rohr

We often talk about praying to God or praying to Jesus. Somehow if we pray hard enough our prayer flies straight to Jesus and that's all we have to do. But it is totally different to say that prayer is praying through Jesus or that Jesus prays through us. This is very comforting when we find prayer difficult or when our energy levels are low. Like a receiver, an instrument or a tuning fork, all we have to do is be open and let God work through us.

On Monday (May 18th) churches reopened as places for personal prayer (This is the current situation in Ireland). This is great news for sure. This is part of a phased plan towards being able to celebrate the sacraments with a congregation at a later date. There will be one door for entry and one for exit, with hand sanitisers on entry and exit. We know that for many people their local church is a place of comfort and solace. It is a place where they can pray be still, reflect, give thanks or light a candle.

It is also important to say that while churches may be reopening as places of personal prayer, there is no pressure whatsoever to go there for now. If you prefer to stay away for now that's absolutely fine. When we pray we can pray almost anywhere. It might be in a favourite part of your home, maybe your favourite spot in your garden or maybe it might be as you go for a walk outdoors. We believe God is present everywhere and whenever we create a prayer moment we are in a good place.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Tuesday
May-19
'Notice that all of the great liturgical prayers of the churches end with the same phrase: "through Christ our Lord, Amen." We do not pray to Christ; we pray through Christ. Or even more precisely, Christ prays through us. We are always and forever the conduits, the instruments, the tuning forks, the receiver stations. We slowly learn the right frequencies that pick up the signal of God.' ~Richard Rohr

We often talk about praying to God or praying to Jesus. Somehow if we pray hard enough our prayer flies straight to Jesus and that's all we have to do. But it is totally different to say that prayer is praying through Jesus or that Jesus prays through us. This is very comforting when we find prayer difficult or when our energy levels are low. Like a receiver, an instrument or a tuning fork, all we have to do is be open and let God work through us.

On Monday (May 18th) churches reopened as places for personal prayer (This is the current situation in Ireland). This is great news for sure. This is part of a phased plan towards being able to celebrate the sacraments with a congregation at a later date. There will be one door for entry and one for exit, with hand sanitisers on entry and exit. We know that for many people their local church is a place of comfort and solace. It is a place where they can pray be still, reflect, give thanks or light a candle.

It is also important to say that while churches may be reopening as places of personal prayer, there is no pressure whatsoever to go there for now. If you prefer to stay away for now that's absolutely fine. When we pray we can pray almost anywhere. It might be in a favourite part of your home, maybe your favourite spot in your garden or maybe it might be as you go for a walk outdoors. We believe God is present everywhere and whenever we create a prayer moment we are in a good place.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Monday
May-18
'Notice that all of the great liturgical prayers of the churches end with the same phrase: "through Christ our Lord, Amen." We do not pray to Christ; we pray through Christ. Or even more precisely, Christ prays through us. We are always and forever the conduits, the instruments, the tuning forks, the receiver stations. We slowly learn the right frequencies that pick up the signal of God.' ~Richard Rohr

We often talk about praying to God or praying to Jesus. Somehow if we pray hard enough our prayer flies straight to Jesus and that's all we have to do. But it is totally different to say that prayer is praying through Jesus or that Jesus prays through us. This is very comforting when we find prayer difficult or when our energy levels are low. Like a receiver, an instrument or a tuning fork, all we have to do is be open and let God work through us.

On today Monday (May 18th) churches will be reopening as places for personal prayer (This is the current situation in Ireland). This is great news for sure. This is part of a phased plan towards being able to celebrate the sacraments with a congregation at a later date. There will be one door for entry and one for exit, with hand sanitisers on entry and exit. We know that for many people their local church is a place of comfort and solace. It is a place where they can pray be still, reflect, give thanks or light a candle.

It is also important to say that while churches may be reopening as places of personal prayer, there is no pressure whatsoever to go there for now. If you prefer to stay away for now that's absolutely fine. When we pray we can pray almost anywhere. It might be in a favourite part of your home, maybe your favourite spot in your garden or maybe it might be as you go for a walk outdoors. We believe God is present everywhere and whenever we create a prayer moment we are in a good place.
 
 
 
  Sunday
May-17
"'he same set of stones may be stumbling blocks or stepping stones, depending on how we use them.' ~Russian Proverb

In life we too face the stumbling blocks and stepping stones. We all have an appreciation of special and significant occasions, like the birth of a baby, a christening, a birthday, an unexpected surprise, a sporting occasion and so much more. Sometimes we also hit difficult patches in our lives. These patches can be obstacles or stepping stones. A lot depends on our attitude and our willingness to see these difficult patches as short term. Jesus constantly encouraged people to change their attitudes. He gave people the self belief that negative life situations should never dominate. No situation in life is ever impossible.
 
 
 
  Friday
May-15
Thought For The Week

"In Asia they say that life is a great river and it will flow, no matter what you do or don't do. We can decide to flow with the river or to battle it. The river doesn't care. Life doesn't care." ~Vincent Travers

So much can be said about rivers. We are only too aware of the great power of a river in flood and in contrast the beauty of a gentle flowing river in the height of summer. Every river has an energy and flow that nothing can stop. Even a dam has its limits.

Comparing life to a river is a good image. The many meandering twists and turns of a river reflect life and its unpredictability. Every day brings us some measure of how uncertain life can be. Life can be so uplifting and rewarding but just as quick it can be cruel and unforgiving. We have no option but to go with the flow.

Where does God come into the whole picture? I like the image of the banks on either side of the river that somehow guide the flow of the river. God is there to guide us along through the unpredictable nature of life. It may seem sometimes that God is not around because rivers do flood but even in a flood the banks on either side are still doing a job.

It is my firm belief that during these difficult times and uncertainty that God is still there to guide us. Yes in a big flood the banks of the river cannot be seen but they are there. Eventually this great flood that is Covid-19 will recede. We put our trust and hope in God to guide and direct us.

We pray for all who have asked us to pray for them. This weekend we in particular remember all our Leaving Cert students during these difficult times. I will finish with the opening lines of our Gospel this weekend: "Do not let your hearts be troubled. Trust in God still and trust in me." ~John 14:1


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Thursday
May-14
Thought For The Week

"In Asia they say that life is a great river and it will flow, no matter what you do or don't do. We can decide to flow with the river or to battle it. The river doesn't care. Life doesn't care." ~Vincent Travers

So much can be said about rivers. We are only too aware of the great power of a river in flood and in contrast the beauty of a gentle flowing river in the height of summer. Every river has an energy and flow that nothing can stop. Even a dam has its limits.

Comparing life to a river is a good image. The many meandering twists and turns of a river reflect life and its unpredictability. Every day brings us some measure of how uncertain life can be. Life can be so uplifting and rewarding but just as quick it can be cruel and unforgiving. We have no option but to go with the flow.

Where does God come into the whole picture? I like the image of the banks on either side of the river that somehow guide the flow of the river. God is there to guide us along through the unpredictable nature of life. It may seem sometimes that God is not around because rivers do flood but even in a flood the banks on either side are still doing a job.

It is my firm belief that during these difficult times and uncertainty that God is still there to guide us. Yes in a big flood the banks of the river cannot be seen but they are there. Eventually this great flood that is Covid-19 will recede. We put our trust and hope in God to guide and direct us.

We pray for all who have asked us to pray for them. This weekend we in particular remember all our Leaving Cert students during these difficult times. I will finish with the opening lines of our Gospel this weekend: "Do not let your hearts be troubled. Trust in God still and trust in me." ~John 14:1


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Tuesday
May-12
Thought For The Week

"In Asia they say that life is a great river and it will flow, no matter what you do or don't do. We can decide to flow with the river or to battle it. The river doesn't care. Life doesn't care." ~Vincent Travers

So much can be said about rivers. We are only too aware of the great power of a river in flood and in contrast the beauty of a gentle flowing river in the height of summer. Every river has an energy and flow that nothing can stop. Even a dam has its limits.

Comparing life to a river is a good image. The many meandering twists and turns of a river reflect life and its unpredictability. Every day brings us some measure of how uncertain life can be. Life can be so uplifting and rewarding but just as quick it can be cruel and unforgiving. We have no option but to go with the flow.

Where does God come into the whole picture? I like the image of the banks on either side of the river that somehow guide the flow of the river. God is there to guide us along through the unpredictable nature of life. It may seem sometimes that God is not around because rivers do flood but even in a flood the banks on either side are still doing a job.

It is my firm belief that during these difficult times and uncertainty that God is still there to guide us. Yes in a big flood the banks of the river cannot be seen but they are there. Eventually this great flood that is Covid-19 will recede. We put our trust and hope in God to guide and direct us.

We pray for all who have asked us to pray for them. This weekend we in particular remember all our Leaving Cert students during these difficult times. I will finish with the opening lines of our Gospel this weekend: "Do not let your hearts be troubled. Trust in God still and trust in me." ~John 14:1


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Sunday
May-10
Thought For The Week

'Deep prayer doesn't come easy for us. Why? We struggle to make time for prayer. Prayer doesn't accomplish anything practical for us, it's a waste of time in terms of tending to the pressures and tasks of daily life and so we hesitate to go there' ~Ron Rolheiser

A recent survey that came out during the week indicated that since the start of the covid19 pandemic, people are exercising more. The biggest uptake has been with walking and this comes as no surprise. Walking gets us out of the house, gets us moving and as an exercise is most beneficial.

I wonder if there was a survey done on prayer what results would we get? If the main question was: Have you prayed more since the start of the covid19 pandemic? What would your answer be? I sense and feel that there is a big increase. It's not that we have now more time to pray but an inner sense that maybe we lost our connection to God and lost our sense of spirituality. Now seems a good time to reclaim some of that lost ground.

We have often hesitated with prayer because we feel out of our depth or lose concentration easy or get easily distracted. This must be our starting point. We are not on our own if we have hesitated with prayer and still hesitate. In our Gospels it is Jesus who is the inspiration for all of us who struggle with prayer. We find Jesus praying in nearly every kind of situation, in the happy and sad occasions, in tragedies and in setbacks. We find him praying as he went about his daily work, we find him praying with others and praying on his own, sometimes going off to a quiet spot where no one could find him.

Most often he prayed in the ordinary down to earth moments that made up his daily life. The disciples were most impressed. They knew that he drew his energy, motivation and drive from a power outside of this world. This spiritual energy enabled him to do things they could only dream of doing. The disciples really wanted to do something similar and their natural reaction was 'Lord, teach us to pray.' Jesus didn't show them one way of praying but reminded them that there are many.

The biggest mistake is to think there is only one type of prayer or only one way of praying. Pray in a way that works for you. Ask for a blessing. Give thanks for a blessing received. Remember someone who needs a prayer. Be open to God's protection and love. Ask for light, hope, courage and direction. Pray to your Guardian Angel. Pray to a Saint. Pray to Mary who many turn to during the month of May. Remember a loved one who has died. Pray for healing, forgiveness and peace in your life.

If one of these seem a good place to start with prayer, then let that be a starting point. Maybe you have a different starting point and if you have that's even better again. With prayer doing everything gets us nowhere. But doing something small and doing it well gets us somewhere. It is my firm belief that this somewhere is good, it is safe and really worth doing. We all need this somewhere during these difficult times.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Friday
May-08
Thought For The Week

'Deep prayer doesn't come easy for us. Why? We struggle to make time for prayer. Prayer doesn't accomplish anything practical for us, it's a waste of time in terms of tending to the pressures and tasks of daily life and so we hesitate to go there' ~Ron Rolheiser

A recent survey that came out during the week indicated that since the start of the covid19 pandemic, people are exercising more. The biggest uptake has been with walking and this comes as no surprise. Walking gets us out of the house, gets us moving and as an exercise is most beneficial.

I wonder if there was a survey done on prayer what results would we get? If the main question was: Have you prayed more since the start of the covid19 pandemic? What would your answer be? I sense and feel that there is a big increase. It's not that we have now more time to pray but an inner sense that maybe we lost our connection to God and lost our sense of spirituality. Now seems a good time to reclaim some of that lost ground.

We have often hesitated with prayer because we feel out of our depth or lose concentration easy or get easily distracted. This must be our starting point. We are not on our own if we have hesitated with prayer and still hesitate. In our Gospels it is Jesus who is the inspiration for all of us who struggle with prayer. We find Jesus praying in nearly every kind of situation, in the happy and sad occasions, in tragedies and in setbacks. We find him praying as he went about his daily work, we find him praying with others and praying on his own, sometimes going off to a quiet spot where no one could find him.

Most often he prayed in the ordinary down to earth moments that made up his daily life. The disciples were most impressed. They knew that he drew his energy, motivation and drive from a power outside of this world. This spiritual energy enabled him to do things they could only dream of doing. The disciples really wanted to do something similar and their natural reaction was 'Lord, teach us to pray.' Jesus didn't show them one way of praying but reminded them that there are many.

The biggest mistake is to think there is only one type of prayer or only one way of praying. Pray in a way that works for you. Ask for a blessing. Give thanks for a blessing received. Remember someone who needs a prayer. Be open to God's protection and love. Ask for light, hope, courage and direction. Pray to your Guardian Angel. Pray to a Saint. Pray to Mary who many turn to during the month of May. Remember a loved one who has died. Pray for healing, forgiveness and peace in your life.

If one of these seem a good place to start with prayer, then let that be a starting point. Maybe you have a different starting point and if you have that's even better again. With prayer doing everything gets us nowhere. But doing something small and doing it well gets us somewhere. It is my firm belief that this somewhere is good, it is safe and really worth doing. We all need this somewhere during these difficult times.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Thursday
May-07
Thought For The Week

'Deep prayer doesn't come easy for us. Why? We struggle to make time for prayer. Prayer doesn't accomplish anything practical for us, it's a waste of time in terms of tending to the pressures and tasks of daily life and so we hesitate to go there' ~Ron Rolheiser

A recent survey that came out during the week indicated that since the start of the covid19 pandemic, people are exercising more. The biggest uptake has been with walking and this comes as no surprise. Walking gets us out of the house, gets us moving and as an exercise is most beneficial.

I wonder if there was a survey done on prayer what results would we get? If the main question was: Have you prayed more since the start of the covid19 pandemic? What would your answer be? I sense and feel that there is a big increase. It's not that we have now more time to pray but an inner sense that maybe we lost our connection to God and lost our sense of spirituality. Now seems a good time to reclaim some of that lost ground.

We have often hesitated with prayer because we feel out of our depth or lose concentration easy or get easily distracted. This must be our starting point. We are not on our own if we have hesitated with prayer and still hesitate. In our Gospels it is Jesus who is the inspiration for all of us who struggle with prayer. We find Jesus praying in nearly every kind of situation, in the happy and sad occasions, in tragedies and in setbacks. We find him praying as he went about his daily work, we find him praying with others and praying on his own, sometimes going off to a quiet spot where no one could find him.

Most often he prayed in the ordinary down to earth moments that made up his daily life. The disciples were most impressed. They knew that he drew his energy, motivation and drive from a power outside of this world. This spiritual energy enabled him to do things they could only dream of doing. The disciples really wanted to do something similar and their natural reaction was 'Lord, teach us to pray.' Jesus didn't show them one way of praying but reminded them that there are many.

The biggest mistake is to think there is only one type of prayer or only one way of praying. Pray in a way that works for you. Ask for a blessing. Give thanks for a blessing received. Remember someone who needs a prayer. Be open to God's protection and love. Ask for light, hope, courage and direction. Pray to your Guardian Angel. Pray to a Saint. Pray to Mary who many turn to during the month of May. Remember a loved one who has died. Pray for healing, forgiveness and peace in your life.

If one of these seem a good place to start with prayer, then let that be a starting point. Maybe you have a different starting point and if you have that's even better again. With prayer doing everything gets us nowhere. But doing something small and doing it well gets us somewhere. It is my firm belief that this somewhere is good, it is safe and really worth doing. We all need this somewhere during these difficult times.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Wednesday
May-06
'I am thankful to be given the chance to perhaps be in the right place at the right time and so be a light in life of a few.' ~Roisin Hall

How often have we heard someone say that they were in the wrong place at the wrong time. If only the clock could be turned back to change things but sadly it can't. Just as the clock can't turn back, neither can it be pushed forward and that leaves us with today. This day is made up of many significant moments.

Thankfully we can choose to be in the right place at the right time for someone in our lives today. It need not be earth shattering and it need not cost the world. God is often most active and alive in the simplest, down to earth moments of our daily lives. Any gesture done with love means we are always in the right place at the right time.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
May-05
Thought For The Week

'Deep prayer doesn't come easy for us. Why? We struggle to make time for prayer. Prayer doesn't accomplish anything practical for us, it's a waste of time in terms of tending to the pressures and tasks of daily life and so we hesitate to go there' ~Ron Rolheiser

A recent survey that came out during the week indicated that since the start of the covid19 pandemic, people are exercising more. The biggest uptake has been with walking and this comes as no surprise. Walking gets us out of the house, gets us moving and as an exercise is most beneficial.

I wonder if there was a survey done on prayer what results would we get? If the main question was: Have you prayed more since the start of the covid19 pandemic? What would your answer be? I sense and feel that there is a big increase. It's not that we have now more time to pray but an inner sense that maybe we lost our connection to God and lost our sense of spirituality. Now seems a good time to reclaim some of that lost ground.

We have often hesitated with prayer because we feel out of our depth or lose concentration easy or get easily distracted. This must be our starting point. We are not on our own if we have hesitated with prayer and still hesitate. In our Gospels it is Jesus who is the inspiration for all of us who struggle with prayer. We find Jesus praying in nearly every kind of situation, in the happy and sad occasions, in tragedies and in setbacks. We find him praying as he went about his daily work, we find him praying with others and praying on his own, sometimes going off to a quiet spot where no one could find him.

Most often he prayed in the ordinary down to earth moments that made up his daily life. The disciples were most impressed. They knew that he drew his energy, motivation and drive from a power outside of this world. This spiritual energy enabled him to do things they could only dream of doing. The disciples really wanted to do something similar and their natural reaction was 'Lord, teach us to pray.' Jesus didn't show them one way of praying but reminded them that there are many.

The biggest mistake is to think there is only one type of prayer or only one way of praying. Pray in a way that works for you. Ask for a blessing. Give thanks for a blessing received. Remember someone who needs a prayer. Be open to God's protection and love. Ask for light, hope, courage and direction. Pray to your Guardian Angel. Pray to a Saint. Pray to Mary who many turn to during the month of May. Remember a loved one who has died. Pray for healing, forgiveness and peace in your life.

If one of these seem a good place to start with prayer, then let that be a starting point. Maybe you have a different starting point and if you have that's even better again. With prayer doing everything gets us nowhere. But doing something small and doing it well gets us somewhere. It is my firm belief that this somewhere is good, it is safe and really worth doing. We all need this somewhere during these difficult times.
 
 
 
  Sunday
May-03
'Divine Providence is a conspiracy of accidents through which God speaks.' ~James Mackey

Do you believe in Divine Providence? Or do you see it as a random act of pure luck that happens to come your way? For each person the answer is personal. If God is a part of your life and even if at times this connection is haphazard or distant, we can still be sure that Divine Providence is never too far away.

The Bible is a collection of books telling us about God's finger in the midst of many different events over a long period of time. The task of faith is to try and understand what God is saying, not just in these events but in our own personal lives and events too. In understanding Divine Providence, God is not a magician. God can't prevent random acts from happening and God doesn't answer every prayer with a yes. Divine Providence assures us that there is something more to life as we know it. It also assures us that somehow in this crazy complex world that we live in, there is meaning, fulfilment and a purpose to everything we do.
 
 
 
  Friday
May-01
'May your roots go down deep into the soil of God's marvellous love. May you have the power to understand as all God's people should, how wide, how long, how high and how deep God's love really is.' ~Ephesians 3:17-18

During the current restriction of movement due to the Covid-19 pandemic, our gardens have become a great source of joy. Those lucky to have a garden can get out and watch the many flowers beginning to emerge. Another observation noted by many is that during the past few weeks the birds have been singing with a great energy. Doing any form of gardening is relaxing and is a very healthy distraction.

Any gardener will be aware of the root system of plants and trees. When moving a shrub or a plant the general advice is to bring and leave as much soil with and around the roots. This is to minimise the disturbance to the plant. There are many different types of root systems. The deepest roots are generally found in deserts where the roots have to go way down to get to a water source.

The majority of roots on most plants are however found relatively close to the surface where nutrient availability and aeration are more favourable for growth. The main purpose of a root is that it anchors the plant to the earth and it also collects the water and nutrients necessary for plant growth.

It should come as no surprise that in spirituality the image of a root is often used. Everyone needs some anchor in life, something to hold us in place and something to keep us from falling over. People have tried lots of different things to keep us anchored. But there is nothing more effective or more important than a belief in a loving God, who is a constant anchor.

Just as a plant needs water and nutrients, we also need spiritual sustenance on our daily journey. Again God is the one who can provide the spiritual energy and sustenance to keep us going through all the ups and downs on our daily journey through life.

For most of the time we cannot see a root system. God's love can sometimes seem hidden especially in the uncertainty of our current pandemic crisis. But we are invited today to begin to understand how important, personal and deep God's love is for us. As part of a vital root system we are all included. We thank God this weekend for being there for us, for being our anchor and for holding us safely through everything.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 

 

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