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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

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Listing February - 2019
 
  Thursday
Feb-28
Thought For The Week

'God didn't promise days without pain, laughter without sorrow, sun without rain, but God did promise strength for the day, comfort for the tears and light for the way' ~Author Unknown

There is a story about a Sufi master who once set himself up at a crossroads. He lit a very bright lamp and a distance away, a candle. Then he sat by the candle and read his book. People watching him were confused. Why didn't he read by the bright light? The bright lamp, he explained, attracted all the moths, leaving him to read in peace!

In the world we live in today we are like the moth attracted to the bright light. There are many distractions and so many things to do. Often we're trying to keep up, the pace is hectic and we often miss out on the quiet and peaceful moments that pass us by. These quiet moments are represented by the candle in our story.

There is definitely a recent swing towards the candle in our story. Mindfulness is the new buzz word, but mindfulness was present thousands of years ago. The writers of the psalms knew exactly what it meant. The most famous mindful quotation comes from Psalm 23: "Near restful waters God leads me, to revive my drooping spirit."

The quieter moments represented by the candle may not make the headlines or be the brightest of lights but it is often a good place to be. Another way of describing the candle is a moment in prayer. Any quiet moment in prayer is always a good place to be, it nourishes our soul and spirit. Which appeals to you more, the moths next to the big bright light or the quiet space created by the candle?
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-27
Thought For The Week

'God didn't promise days without pain, laughter without sorrow, sun without rain, but God did promise strength for the day, comfort for the tears and light for the way' ~Author Unknown

There is a story about a Sufi master who once set himself up at a crossroads. He lit a very bright lamp and a distance away, a candle. Then he sat by the candle and read his book. People watching him were confused. Why didn't he read by the bright light? The bright lamp, he explained, attracted all the moths, leaving him to read in peace!

In the world we live in today we are like the moth attracted to the bright light. There are many distractions and so many things to do. Often we're trying to keep up, the pace is hectic and we often miss out on the quiet and peaceful moments that pass us by. These quiet moments are represented by the candle in our story.

There is definitely a recent swing towards the candle in our story. Mindfulness is the new buzz word, but mindfulness was present thousands of years ago. The writers of the psalms knew exactly what it meant. The most famous mindful quotation comes from Psalm 23: "Near restful waters God leads me, to revive my drooping spirit."

The quieter moments represented by the candle may not make the headlines or be the brightest of lights but it is often a good place to be. Another way of describing the candle is a moment in prayer. Any quiet moment in prayer is always a good place to be, it nourishes our soul and spirit. Which appeals to you more, the moths next to the big bright light or the quiet space created by the candle?
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-26
Thought For The Week

'God didn't promise days without pain, laughter without sorrow, sun without rain, but God did promise strength for the day, comfort for the tears and light for the way' ~Author Unknown

There is a story about a Sufi master who once set himself up at a crossroads. He lit a very bright lamp and a distance away, a candle. Then he sat by the candle and read his book. People watching him were confused. Why didn't he read by the bright light? The bright lamp, he explained, attracted all the moths, leaving him to read in peace!

In the world we live in today we are like the moth attracted to the bright light. There are many distractions and so many things to do. Often we're trying to keep up, the pace is hectic and we often miss out on the quiet and peaceful moments that pass us by. These quiet moments are represented by the candle in our story.

There is definitely a recent swing towards the candle in our story. Mindfulness is the new buzz word, but mindfulness was present thousands of years ago. The writers of the psalms knew exactly what it meant. The most famous mindful quotation comes from Psalm 23: "Near restful waters God leads me, to revive my drooping spirit."

The quieter moments represented by the candle may not make the headlines or be the brightest of lights but it is often a good place to be. Another way of describing the candle is a moment in prayer. Any quiet moment in prayer is always a good place to be, it nourishes our soul and spirit. Which appeals to you more, the moths next to the big bright light or the quiet space created by the candle?
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-25
Thought For The Week

'God didn't promise days without pain, laughter without sorrow, sun without rain, but God did promise strength for the day, comfort for the tears and light for the way' ~Author Unknown

There is a story about a Sufi master who once set himself up at a crossroads. He lit a very bright lamp and a distance away, a candle. Then he sat by the candle and read his book. People watching him were confused. Why didn't he read by the bright light? The bright lamp, he explained, attracted all the moths, leaving him to read in peace!

In the world we live in today we are like the moth attracted to the bright light. There are many distractions and so many things to do. Often we're trying to keep up, the pace is hectic and we often miss out on the quiet and peaceful moments that pass us by. These quiet moments are represented by the candle in our story.

There is definitely a recent swing towards the candle in our story. Mindfulness is the new buzz word, but mindfulness was present thousands of years ago. The writers of the psalms knew exactly what it meant. The most famous mindful quotation comes from Psalm 23: "Near restful waters God leads me, to revive my drooping spirit."

The quieter moments represented by the candle may not make the headlines or be the brightest of lights but it is often a good place to be. Another way of describing the candle is a moment in prayer. Any quiet moment in prayer is always a good place to be, it nourishes our soul and spirit. Which appeals to you more, the moths next to the big bright light or the quiet space created by the candle?
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-24
There's a story told about a tourist who visited a small village in western Africa. She saw on her walk around, a collection of television sets stacked four deep in a hut at the end of the village. This same village had received electricity just a few years earlier. No doubt some manufacturer had presented the people with the essential TV's. But the tourist was obviously confused by the fact that they were not used and so she went to talk to the village chief. She asked him, "Why don't your people use the television sets." The chief replied, "We have our storyteller." But she replied, "Maybe so, but the television has the capacity for thousands of stories." "That's true", said the chief, "but our storyteller knows us."

Nothing can compete with those who know our story best. The Gospels are a collection of stories about Jesus. Like the storyteller above, he knows us better than anyone else. Nothing can replace the intimacy, love and understanding he brings to all our lives.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-23
Fasting or Feasting

Fast from complaining and feast on appreciation.
Fast from bitterness and feast on forgiveness.
Fast from idle gossip and feast on purposeful silence.
Fast from judging others and feast on the Christ within them.
Fast from emphasis on differences and feast on the unity of life.
Fast from apparent darkness and feast on the reality of light.
Fast from thoughts of illness and feast on the healing power of God.
Fast from words that pollute and feast on phrases that uplift.
Fast from anger and feast on optimism.
Fast from discouragement and feast on hope.
Fast from facts that depress and feast on anything that inspires.
Fast from lethargy and feast on enthusiasm.
Fast from suspicion and feast on truth.
Fast from problems that overwhelm and feast on prayer that gives us the strength to get through.
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-22
'I only feel angry when I see waste. When I see people throwing away things we could use.' ~Mother Teresa

 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-20
Thought For The Week

'See, I have inscribed you on the palms of my hands. You are continually before me.' ~Isaiah 49:16

There are many holy wells to be found throughout Ireland. One that has frequent visitors is the well of St Gobnait at Ballyvourney, Co.Cork (Irl). Last Monday (Feb 11th) hundreds of people visited this holy place to mark the feast of St Gobnait. They came from near and far to be part of a special place. It is said that even on the quietest of days at St Gobnait's, there is always someone present.

At the well you will find a collection of photographs, medals, rosary beads, prayer cards, memorial cards and lots of other personal stuff. To an outsider it may seem all a bit random. But every single item on display is a reflection of someone's story. It is obvious that some of the stories are sad, but each item was placed with love, with hope and with a prayer. It is a beautiful deep spirituality that is touching.

St Gobnait's at Ballyvourney is a place of quiet reflection that bubbles with the gentle presence of God. Many also do the rounds, by walking and praying. In the busy and hectic pace of life, these rounds bring a calm and peace that is difficult to find elsewhere. There are rocks everywhere with deep imprints of crosses as people rub the imprint with a sharp stone. It is a quiet ritual that touches something deep within.

We are told that each of us is carved in the hands of God. It means that everything we do matters to God. God has chosen us, we are loved, special and unique. God will never forget any of us. We will always be in God's tender loving care. Even when life throws everything at us, God will never do so. We will be helped to find balance and calm as we journey through the fragility of life. Anne Costa puts it so well when she says that: "with a whisper, God can make us whole." We may be off balance this weekend for different reasons. But we pray to God to help us to be open to those whispers of God's gentle presence all around us. I recommend a visit to St Gobnait's if you want to visit a place of peace and quiet. If you need a spiritual recharge, you will not be disappointed.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-19
Thought For The Week

'See, I have inscribed you on the palms of my hands. You are continually before me.' ~Isaiah 49:16

There are many holy wells to be found throughout Ireland. One that has frequent visitors is the well of St Gobnait at Ballyvourney, Co.Cork (Irl). Last Monday (Feb 11th) hundreds of people visited this holy place to mark the feast of St Gobnait. They came from near and far to be part of a special place. It is said that even on the quietest of days at St Gobnait's, there is always someone present.

At the well you will find a collection of photographs, medals, rosary beads, prayer cards, memorial cards and lots of other personal stuff. To an outsider it may seem all a bit random. But every single item on display is a reflection of someone's story. It is obvious that some of the stories are sad, but each item was placed with love, with hope and with a prayer. It is a beautiful deep spirituality that is touching.

St Gobnait's at Ballyvourney is a place of quiet reflection that bubbles with the gentle presence of God. Many also do the rounds, by walking and praying. In the busy and hectic pace of life, these rounds bring a calm and peace that is difficult to find elsewhere. There are rocks everywhere with deep imprints of crosses as people rub the imprint with a sharp stone. It is a quiet ritual that touches something deep within.

We are told that each of us is carved in the hands of God. It means that everything we do matters to God. God has chosen us, we are loved, special and unique. God will never forget any of us. We will always be in God's tender loving care. Even when life throws everything at us, God will never do so. We will be helped to find balance and calm as we journey through the fragility of life. Anne Costa puts it so well when she says that: "with a whisper, God can make us whole." We may be off balance this weekend for different reasons. But we pray to God to help us to be open to those whispers of God's gentle presence all around us. I recommend a visit to St Gobnait's if you want to visit a place of peace and quiet. If you need a spiritual recharge, you will not be disappointed.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-18
Thought For The Week

'See, I have inscribed you on the palms of my hands. You are continually before me.' ~Isaiah 49:16

There are many holy wells to be found throughout Ireland. One that has frequent visitors is the well of St Gobnait at Ballyvourney, Co.Cork (Irl). Last Monday (Feb 11th) hundreds of people visited this holy place to mark the feast of St Gobnait. They came from near and far to be part of a special place. It is said that even on the quietest of days at St Gobnait's, there is always someone present.

At the well you will find a collection of photographs, medals, rosary beads, prayer cards, memorial cards and lots of other personal stuff. To an outsider it may seem all a bit random. But every single item on display is a reflection of someone's story. It is obvious that some of the stories are sad, but each item was placed with love, with hope and with a prayer. It is a beautiful deep spirituality that is touching.

St Gobnait's at Ballyvourney is a place of quiet reflection that bubbles with the gentle presence of God. Many also do the rounds, by walking and praying. In the busy and hectic pace of life, these rounds bring a calm and peace that is difficult to find elsewhere. There are rocks everywhere with deep imprints of crosses as people rub the imprint with a sharp stone. It is a quiet ritual that touches something deep within.

We are told that each of us is carved in the hands of God. It means that everything we do matters to God. God has chosen us, we are loved, special and unique. God will never forget any of us. We will always be in God's tender loving care. Even when life throws everything at us, God will never do so. We will be helped to find balance and calm as we journey through the fragility of life. Anne Costa puts it so well when she says that: "with a whisper, God can make us whole." We may be off balance this weekend for different reasons. But we pray to God to help us to be open to those whispers of God's gentle presence all around us. I recommend a visit to St Gobnait's if you want to visit a place of peace and quiet. If you need a spiritual recharge, you will not be disappointed.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-16
'If you have a coin and I have a coin and we exchange coins, you still have a coin and I still have one coin. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange ideas, you now have two ideas and I now have two ideas.' ~Author Unknown

We cannot journey through life on our own. As we journey with people and those closest to us, we are constantly exchanging ideas, values and what is important to us. We may not agree with everything others may say but at least we have more information to make a better decision and a better choice. The same applies to faith matters. It's all about exchanging what's special and important to us. Anything that is loving and good will always search and find the same in someone else. When this has its roots in God the end results are always productive and always to our benefit.
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-15
Thought For The Week

'There is such a thing as a prayer place and many people are very aware of that in their lives. It's a place where I can get away from it all.' ~Jack McArdle

We sometimes think that prayer must just be confined to a church. Anywhere else seems out of place. But we can simply pray anywhere that works for us. That can be in our kitchen, a bedroom, a favourite armchair, a favourite walk, artwork, listening to or playing music or time out working in our garden. The choice is endless and it is ours. There is great freedom in finding a place that works for each of us. We have heard many times about how important prayer is. But we often don't get much guidance on how to begin or what to do.

Muhammad Ali famously said that it wasn't the mountains ahead that wear us out, but it's the pebble in our shoe that does the wearing out. Life can be fragile and difficult at the best of times and those difficult pebbles often end up in our shoes. Prayer could be described as time to stop and take the pebble out or at least doing something with it. Once the pebble is out we are ready for the next step and the next challenge. Our faith does not promise that there won't be pebbles but it does put us in a much better position to deal with them.

Prayer can be described as time to recharge, reconnect, reenergise and start again. Prayer needs time, not lots of it but enough to give it some chance to work. Whatever or wherever your prayer place is, just for you to know it is special to you and it is your sacred place. It's a place where we can simply get away from it all.

It's a place where we can recharge, renew and reflect on the blessings in our own lives. It's a place where we can pray to God and share whatever is going on in our lives. This coming week could be a good time to re-find that place in your life where you can connect with God in the way that works best for you.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-14
'Time is too slow for those who wait, too swift for those who fear, too long for those who grieve, too short for those who rejoice, but for those who love, time is eternity.' ~Henry Van Dyke

Some will say Valentine's Day is a load of hype and completely built up into something way too big. Despite the commercial side of the day, it is good to set aside at least one day to genuinely show someone we love and care. Routine and life's daily challenges keep us firmly focussed. But sometimes we forget and take for granted those who really matter. Life is far too short to forget those who really matter to us. Today is a day when we can show someone how much they really mean to us. We thank God for that someone special in our lives. We all fall well short in living up to be the perfect husband, wife, partner, friend, carer or whatever word best sums up our situation. But we make an honest effort in bringing the best out of the person who means the world to us.

Today we say thank you for the great blessings that genuine love can bring. For some today is a sad day because that someone special may have died or may just not be there. We remember them too today. We also remember most importantly how true love always has its roots in God. We celebrate on St Valentine's Day God's unique love for us. We are valuable because God loves us and nothing or no person can ever take that from any of us.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-13
Thought For The Week

'There is such a thing as a prayer place and many people are very aware of that in their lives. It's a place where I can get away from it all.' ~Jack McArdle

We sometimes think that prayer must just be confined to a church. Anywhere else seems out of place. But we can simply pray anywhere that works for us. That can be in our kitchen, a bedroom, a favourite armchair, a favourite walk, artwork, listening to or playing music or time out working in our garden. The choice is endless and it is ours. There is great freedom in finding a place that works for each of us. We have heard many times about how important prayer is. But we often don't get much guidance on how to begin or what to do.

Muhammad Ali famously said that it wasn't the mountains ahead that wear us out, but it's the pebble in our shoe that does the wearing out. Life can be fragile and difficult at the best of times and those difficult pebbles often end up in our shoes. Prayer could be described as time to stop and take the pebble out or at least doing something with it. Once the pebble is out we are ready for the next step and the next challenge. Our faith does not promise that there won't be pebbles but it does put us in a much better position to deal with them.

Prayer can be described as time to recharge, reconnect, reenergise and start again. Prayer needs time, not lots of it but enough to give it some chance to work. Whatever or wherever your prayer place is, just for you to know it is special to you and it is your sacred place. It's a place where we can simply get away from it all.

It's a place where we can recharge, renew and reflect on the blessings in our own lives. It's a place where we can pray to God and share whatever is going on in our lives. This coming week could be a good time to re-find that place in your life where you can connect with God in the way that works best for you.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-11
Thought For The Week

'There is such a thing as a prayer place and many people are very aware of that in their lives. It's a place where I can get away from it all.' ~Jack McArdle

We sometimes think that prayer must just be confined to a church. Anywhere else seems out of place. But we can simply pray anywhere that works for us. That can be in our kitchen, a bedroom, a favourite armchair, a favourite walk, artwork, listening to or playing music or time out working in our garden. The choice is endless and it is ours. There is great freedom in finding a place that works for each of us. We have heard many times about how important prayer is. But we often don't get much guidance on how to begin or what to do.

Muhammad Ali famously said that it wasn't the mountains ahead that wear us out, but it's the pebble in our shoe that does the wearing out. Life can be fragile and difficult at the best of times and those difficult pebbles often end up in our shoes. Prayer could be described as time to stop and take the pebble out or at least doing something with it. Once the pebble is out we are ready for the next step and the next challenge. Our faith does not promise that there won't be pebbles but it does put us in a much better position to deal with them.

Prayer can be described as time to recharge, reconnect, reenergise and start again. Prayer needs time, not lots of it but enough to give it some chance to work. Whatever or wherever your prayer place is, just for you to know it is special to you and it is your sacred place. It's a place where we can simply get away from it all.

It's a place where we can recharge, renew and reflect on the blessings in our own lives. It's a place where we can pray to God and share whatever is going on in our lives. This coming week could be a good time to re-find that place in your life where you can connect with God in the way that works best for you.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-10
Thought For Today by Triona Doherty called 'Walking with the Lord'

Last July and August, hundreds of people took part in 'Walk While You Can', a walk from Letterkenny, County Donegal to Ballydehob, County Cork, to raise awareness and funds to support those with Motor Neurone Disease. The event was the brainchild of Fr Tony Coote, a priest of the parishes of Kilmacud and Mount Merrion in Dublin, who made the decision to walk the length of Ireland after himself being diagnosed with MND.

His boundless energy and zest for life, even in the face of terminal illness, struck a chord with many. People were inspired by his faith. Speaking during an interview on The Late Late Show, Fr Tony said: 'I haven't much time left, I know that. But I believe in a loving God; I don't fear death.' Fr Tony is an example of someone who is following Jesus as a disciple, while also bringing others to Jesus. In his years as a priest he has preached and lived the Gospel, and since this massive change in his health and circumstances he has found a way to spread the Good News in a new way.

His story came to mind as I reflected on today's Gospel, which tells the story of the call of Peter. We are often struck by how the first disciples 'left everything and followed him'. Are we expected to do the same? Only a rare few will literally leave behind home, friends and family. But following Jesus does require us to offer our whole selves, whatever our circumstances. Whatever our position in life, we have something unique and great to offer.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-09
Thought For The Week

'A great resurgence of interest in all aspects of our Celtic heritage is leading many individuals and groups to rediscover and draw inspiration from the lives of the early Irish saints. St Brigid, the patroness of Ireland, is emerging as one whose life has relevance and inspiration for us as we try to face the issues that confront our country and our world at this time.' ~Rita Minehan

At last we had a touch of winter during last week. January had been so mild and many lawns got their first cut during the early part of the New Year. This was unheard of before and is another strong hint that climate change is taking a firmer hold. The feast of St Brigid which we celebrated last Friday traditionally marks the arrival of spring. One thing that is certain at this time of year is the very noticeable stretch in the evenings. It is good and a strong reminder that spring is on the way.

The feast of St Brigid is a day to reflect on all our present blessings and all the good around us. She had time for everyone including the poor but above all she inspired people to greater things. Using rushes she wove them all into a cross, to remind us that all the different strands of our lives are connected. They are connected not by chance but by the gentle presence of God in our lives.

The idea that everything in our universe and life is all connected is a common theme among spiritual writers today. But this wasn't always the case. Spirituality and everyday life were often kept separate in years past. There was no connection between belief in God and what happened in your everyday life. As a result religion tended to be put up on a pedestal which was never a good thing. Brigid was years ahead of her time, in how she connected God with everything.

Her voice and message is still so relevant in our modern world. Brigid gathers our rushes of sorrows and gladness, of happiness and pain, tears and laughter, kindness and caring, of voluntary groups and organisations, of families, relations and friends, of schools and hospitals, of work, sport and recreation and all the little things we do with faith, hope and love. Brigid weaves them all with loving hands into something richer and more beautiful. For her God is always at the centre of everything. Like her we do our best to find balance in everything we do each day. We ask her many blessings on us today and during the coming week.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-08
Thought For The Week

'A great resurgence of interest in all aspects of our Celtic heritage is leading many individuals and groups to rediscover and draw inspiration from the lives of the early Irish saints. St Brigid, the patroness of Ireland, is emerging as one whose life has relevance and inspiration for us as we try to face the issues that confront our country and our world at this time.' ~Rita Minehan

At last we had a touch of winter during last week. January had been so mild and many lawns got their first cut during the early part of the New Year. This was unheard of before and is another strong hint that climate change is taking a firmer hold. The feast of St Brigid which we celebrated last Friday traditionally marks the arrival of spring. One thing that is certain at this time of year is the very noticeable stretch in the evenings. It is good and a strong reminder that spring is on the way.

The feast of St Brigid is a day to reflect on all our present blessings and all the good around us. She had time for everyone including the poor but above all she inspired people to greater things. Using rushes she wove them all into a cross, to remind us that all the different strands of our lives are connected. They are connected not by chance but by the gentle presence of God in our lives.

The idea that everything in our universe and life is all connected is a common theme among spiritual writers today. But this wasn't always the case. Spirituality and everyday life were often kept separate in years past. There was no connection between belief in God and what happened in your everyday life. As a result religion tended to be put up on a pedestal which was never a good thing. Brigid was years ahead of her time, in how she connected God with everything.

Her voice and message is still so relevant in our modern world. Brigid gathers our rushes of sorrows and gladness, of happiness and pain, tears and laughter, kindness and caring, of voluntary groups and organisations, of families, relations and friends, of schools and hospitals, of work, sport and recreation and all the little things we do with faith, hope and love. Brigid weaves them all with loving hands into something richer and more beautiful. For her God is always at the centre of everything. Like her we do our best to find balance in everything we do each day. We ask her many blessings on us today and during the coming week.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-06
Thought For The Week

'A great resurgence of interest in all aspects of our Celtic heritage is leading many individuals and groups to rediscover and draw inspiration from the lives of the early Irish saints. St Brigid, the patroness of Ireland, is emerging as one whose life has relevance and inspiration for us as we try to face the issues that confront our country and our world at this time.' ~Rita Minehan

At last we had a touch of winter during last week. January had been so mild and many lawns got their first cut during the early part of the New Year. This was unheard of before and is another strong hint that climate change is taking a firmer hold. The feast of St Brigid which we celebrated last Friday traditionally marks the arrival of spring. One thing that is certain at this time of year is the very noticeable stretch in the evenings. It is good and a strong reminder that spring is on the way.

The feast of St Brigid is a day to reflect on all our present blessings and all the good around us. She had time for everyone including the poor but above all she inspired people to greater things. Using rushes she wove them all into a cross, to remind us that all the different strands of our lives are connected. They are connected not by chance but by the gentle presence of God in our lives.

The idea that everything in our universe and life is all connected is a common theme among spiritual writers today. But this wasn't always the case. Spirituality and everyday life were often kept separate in years past. There was no connection between belief in God and what happened in your everyday life. As a result religion tended to be put up on a pedestal which was never a good thing. Brigid was years ahead of her time, in how she connected God with everything.

Her voice and message is still so relevant in our modern world. Brigid gathers our rushes of sorrows and gladness, of happiness and pain, tears and laughter, kindness and caring, of voluntary groups and organisations, of families, relations and friends, of schools and hospitals, of work, sport and recreation and all the little things we do with faith, hope and love. Brigid weaves them all with loving hands into something richer and more beautiful. For her God is always at the centre of everything. Like her we do our best to find balance in everything we do each day. We ask her many blessings on us today and during the coming week.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-05
Thought For The Week

'A great resurgence of interest in all aspects of our Celtic heritage is leading many individuals and groups to rediscover and draw inspiration from the lives of the early Irish saints. St Brigid, the patroness of Ireland, is emerging as one whose life has relevance and inspiration for us as we try to face the issues that confront our country and our world at this time.' ~Rita Minehan

At last we had a touch of winter during last week. January had been so mild and many lawns got their first cut during the early part of the New Year. This was unheard of before and is another strong hint that climate change is taking a firmer hold. The feast of St Brigid which we celebrated last Friday traditionally marks the arrival of spring. One thing that is certain at this time of year is the very noticeable stretch in the evenings. It is good and a strong reminder that spring is on the way.

The feast of St Brigid is a day to reflect on all our present blessings and all the good around us. She had time for everyone including the poor but above all she inspired people to greater things. Using rushes she wove them all into a cross, to remind us that all the different strands of our lives are connected. They are connected not by chance but by the gentle presence of God in our lives.

The idea that everything in our universe and life is all connected is a common theme among spiritual writers today. But this wasn't always the case. Spirituality and everyday life were often kept separate in years past. There was no connection between belief in God and what happened in your everyday life. As a result religion tended to be put up on a pedestal which was never a good thing. Brigid was years ahead of her time, in how she connected God with everything.

Her voice and message is still so relevant in our modern world. Brigid gathers our rushes of sorrows and gladness, of happiness and pain, tears and laughter, kindness and caring, of voluntary groups and organisations, of families, relations and friends, of schools and hospitals, of work, sport and recreation and all the little things we do with faith, hope and love. Brigid weaves them all with loving hands into something richer and more beautiful. For her God is always at the centre of everything. Like her we do our best to find balance in everything we do each day. We ask her many blessings on us today and during the coming week.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-04
Thought For The Week

'A great resurgence of interest in all aspects of our Celtic heritage is leading many individuals and groups to rediscover and draw inspiration from the lives of the early Irish saints. St Brigid, the patroness of Ireland, is emerging as one whose life has relevance and inspiration for us as we try to face the issues that confront our country and our world at this time.' ~Rita Minehan

At last we had a touch of winter during last week. January had been so mild and many lawns got their first cut during the early part of the New Year. This was unheard of before and is another strong hint that climate change is taking a firmer hold. The feast of St Brigid which we celebrated last Friday traditionally marks the arrival of spring. One thing that is certain at this time of year is the very noticeable stretch in the evenings. It is good and a strong reminder that spring is on the way.

The feast of St Brigid is a day to reflect on all our present blessings and all the good around us. She had time for everyone including the poor but above all she inspired people to greater things. Using rushes she wove them all into a cross, to remind us that all the different strands of our lives are connected. They are connected not by chance but by the gentle presence of God in our lives.

The idea that everything in our universe and life is all connected is a common theme among spiritual writers today. But this wasn't always the case. Spirituality and everyday life were often kept separate in years past. There was no connection between belief in God and what happened in your everyday life. As a result religion tended to be put up on a pedestal which was never a good thing. Brigid was years ahead of her time, in how she connected God with everything.

Her voice and message is still so relevant in our modern world. Brigid gathers our rushes of sorrows and gladness, of happiness and pain, tears and laughter, kindness and caring, of voluntary groups and organisations, of families, relations and friends, of schools and hospitals, of work, sport and recreation and all the little things we do with faith, hope and love. Brigid weaves them all with loving hands into something richer and more beautiful. For her God is always at the centre of everything. Like her we do our best to find balance in everything we do each day. We ask her many blessings on us today and during the coming week.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-03
Thought For The Week

"I sought to hear the voice of God and climbed to the highest steeple, but God declared: 'Go down again - I dwell among the people'." ~John Henry Newman

Last Sunday night many people got up early to see the eclipse of the moon which peaked at 5a.m. The effect of the eclipse created an orange glow which is called a "Blood moon". The moon has fascinated people for thousands of years. We know it has a strong pull on our planet earth, creating the ebb and flow of our tides. Another interesting aspect of the moon is that there is one side of the moon that we never see. They call it 'the dark side of the moon' and it is the side of the moon where the sun never shines. It is the side of the moon which faces the cold, black expanse of space.

The 'dark side of the moon' also has spiritual meaning as well. It can happen when a person of faith experiences darkness and uncertainty. Instead of God being an anchor in their lives, they now experience darkness and emptiness. Old and trusted certainties are now questioned. What once was a steady source of strength and consolation is now empty. It can happen over a period of time or quite suddenly. Events like the loss of loved one through death or an unexpected illness of a family member can be overwhelming and can be the trigger for the winter of the soul.

Spiritual writers from all walks of life agree that this happens occasionally and does not mean it is going to last forever. It is difficult when it happens, it can be confusing and frustrating. But every winter is always followed by spring, growth, renewal and new beginnings. The constant message of scripture is that God is not on the rooftops or up on steeples but is very much with people as they are. God is with us in the sunshine but very much with us in our darkness too. The 'dark side of the moon' can represent so many difficulties and struggles in our lives. Whatever the darkness may be God is there holding the light for us and helping us through one step at a time.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-02
Thought For The Week

"I sought to hear the voice of God and climbed to the highest steeple, but God declared: 'Go down again - I dwell among the people'." ~John Henry Newman

Last Sunday night many people got up early to see the eclipse of the moon which peaked at 5a.m. The effect of the eclipse created an orange glow which is called a "Blood moon". The moon has fascinated people for thousands of years. We know it has a strong pull on our planet earth, creating the ebb and flow of our tides. Another interesting aspect of the moon is that there is one side of the moon that we never see. They call it 'the dark side of the moon' and it is the side of the moon where the sun never shines. It is the side of the moon which faces the cold, black expanse of space.

The 'dark side of the moon' also has spiritual meaning as well. It can happen when a person of faith experiences darkness and uncertainty. Instead of God being an anchor in their lives, they now experience darkness and emptiness. Old and trusted certainties are now questioned. What once was a steady source of strength and consolation is now empty. It can happen over a period of time or quite suddenly. Events like the loss of loved one through death or an unexpected illness of a family member can be overwhelming and can be the trigger for the winter of the soul.

Spiritual writers from all walks of life agree that this happens occasionally and does not mean it is going to last forever. It is difficult when it happens, it can be confusing and frustrating. But every winter is always followed by spring, growth, renewal and new beginnings. The constant message of scripture is that God is not on the rooftops or up on steeples but is very much with people as they are. God is with us in the sunshine but very much with us in our darkness too. The 'dark side of the moon' can represent so many difficulties and struggles in our lives. Whatever the darkness may be God is there holding the light for us and helping us through one step at a time.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-01
Today is the feast day of St Brigid

Brigid is Ireland's most popular saint after St.Patrick. She was born around the middle of the 5th century. She founded a monastery at Kildare. She is also known as 'Mary Of The Gael'. Many miracles have been associated with her. She had a geat love of animals and always had time for people. Her association with fire (symbolising living in the presence of God) was carried on for many centuries after her death. A sacred fire was kept burning in the church at Kildare, each of the 20 nuns taking turn at a night's vigil to tend to it.
She is said to have had great wisdom in dealing with personal problems especially marital. She made a cross from rushes to protect a pagan chief who was sick. It is still made today and hung in houses and outbuildings to protect against evil and fire. It also protects animals.
Her fame spread throughout Europe and many churches were named after her. She is indeed a special saint in Ireland. Great blessings have always been associated with her.
Today is her feast day and we ask her many blessings on us. Amen
 
 

 

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