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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

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Listing July - 2020
 
  Thursday
Jul-16
Thought For The Week

'God speaks to us in two books. One is the little book of scriptures and the other is the big book, the book of creation' ~John Scotus Eriugena.

John Scotus Eriugena was a Celtic monk, a theologian, a philosopher and a poet who died in 877. His main point was that the scriptures do not exclusively tell the story of God, but that the story of God is also to be found in the beauty of creation that is constantly unfolding. For John Scotus both go hand in hand, almost like stereo sound. If we listen to scripture only, we are missing out and if we listen just to creation we are also falling short.

This year is the 5th anniversary of Pope Francis's letter on the environment called 'Laudato Si'. When it was released it got glowing reviews not just in the Christian community but beyond as well. At its heart is a deep appreciation of the natural world, that grew out of a belief that all creation came not out of a void of nothingness but out of the substance of God.

This 'new story' is exciting and refreshing because it means God's presence is to be found everywhere. It is little wonder that many find gardening an enjoyable, refreshing and uplifting spiritual experience. Christine Sine puts it well when she says: "It seems to me that gardening is one of the most profound acts of worship and prayer we can engage in. No matter how small our garden plot, gardening can foster a lived spirituality that can be a source of joy and blessing in our lives."

One of the most beautiful and well known parables of Jesus featured in our Gospel last Sunday and that is the parable of the sower. Jesus was always so in touch with nature, with farming, with creation and with the people all around him.

The parable of the sower reminds me of the beautiful saying: "Don't judge your day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant." From a spiritual point of view we are so grateful for the variety of seeds that we can sow. So whether it is just one tiny seed or many, cherish and celebrate the seed you sow each day.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jul-15
Thought For The Week

'God speaks to us in two books. One is the little book of scriptures and the other is the big book, the book of creation' ~John Scotus Eriugena.

John Scotus Eriugena was a Celtic monk, a theologian, a philosopher and a poet who died in 877. His main point was that the scriptures do not exclusively tell the story of God, but that the story of God is also to be found in the beauty of creation that is constantly unfolding. For John Scotus both go hand in hand, almost like stereo sound. If we listen to scripture only, we are missing out and if we listen just to creation we are also falling short.

This year is the 5th anniversary of Pope Francis's letter on the environment called 'Laudato Si'. When it was released it got glowing reviews not just in the Christian community but beyond as well. At its heart is a deep appreciation of the natural world, that grew out of a belief that all creation came not out of a void of nothingness but out of the substance of God.

This 'new story' is exciting and refreshing because it means God's presence is to be found everywhere. It is little wonder that many find gardening an enjoyable, refreshing and uplifting spiritual experience. Christine Sine puts it well when she says: "It seems to me that gardening is one of the most profound acts of worship and prayer we can engage in. No matter how small our garden plot, gardening can foster a lived spirituality that can be a source of joy and blessing in our lives."

One of the most beautiful and well known parables of Jesus featured in our Gospel last Sunday and that is the parable of the sower. Jesus was always so in touch with nature, with farming, with creation and with the people all around him.

The parable of the sower reminds me of the beautiful saying: "Don't judge your day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant." From a spiritual point of view we are so grateful for the variety of seeds that we can sow. So whether it is just one tiny seed or many, cherish and celebrate the seed you sow each day.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jul-14
Thought For The Week

'God speaks to us in two books. One is the little book of scriptures and the other is the big book, the book of creation' ~John Scotus Eriugena.

John Scotus Eriugena was a Celtic monk, a theologian, a philosopher and a poet who died in 877. His main point was that the scriptures do not exclusively tell the story of God, but that the story of God is also to be found in the beauty of creation that is constantly unfolding. For John Scotus both go hand in hand, almost like stereo sound. If we listen to scripture only, we are missing out and if we listen just to creation we are also falling short.

This year is the 5th anniversary of Pope Francis's letter on the environment called 'Laudato Si'. When it was released it got glowing reviews not just in the Christian community but beyond as well. At its heart is a deep appreciation of the natural world, that grew out of a belief that all creation came not out of a void of nothingness but out of the substance of God.

This 'new story' is exciting and refreshing because it means God's presence is to be found everywhere. It is little wonder that many find gardening an enjoyable, refreshing and uplifting spiritual experience. Christine Sine puts it well when she says: "It seems to me that gardening is one of the most profound acts of worship and prayer we can engage in. No matter how small our garden plot, gardening can foster a lived spirituality that can be a source of joy and blessing in our lives."

One of the most beautiful and well known parables of Jesus featured in our Gospel last Sunday and that is the parable of the sower. Jesus was always so in touch with nature, with farming, with creation and with the people all around him.

The parable of the sower reminds me of the beautiful saying: "Don't judge your day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant." From a spiritual point of view we are so grateful for the variety of seeds that we can sow. So whether it is just one tiny seed or many, cherish and celebrate the seed you sow each day.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Monday
Jul-13
Thought For The Week

'God speaks to us in two books. One is the little book of scriptures and the other is the big book, the book of creation' ~John Scotus Eriugena.

John Scotus Eriugena was a Celtic monk, a theologian, a philosopher and a poet who died in 877. His main point was that the scriptures do not exclusively tell the story of God, but that the story of God is also to be found in the beauty of creation that is constantly unfolding. For John Scotus both go hand in hand, almost like stereo sound. If we listen to scripture only, we are missing out and if we listen just to creation we are also falling short.

This year is the 5th anniversary of Pope Francis's letter on the environment called 'Laudato Si'. When it was released it got glowing reviews not just in the Christian community but beyond as well. At its heart is a deep appreciation of the natural world, that grew out of a belief that all creation came not out of a void of nothingness but out of the substance of God.

This 'new story' is exciting and refreshing because it means God's presence is to be found everywhere. It is little wonder that many find gardening an enjoyable, refreshing and uplifting spiritual experience. Christine Sine puts it well when she says: "It seems to me that gardening is one of the most profound acts of worship and prayer we can engage in. No matter how small our garden plot, gardening can foster a lived spirituality that can be a source of joy and blessing in our lives."

One of the most beautiful and well known parables of Jesus featured in our Gospel yesterday and that is the parable of the sower. Jesus was always so in touch with nature, with farming, with creation and with the people all around him.

The parable of the sower reminds me of the beautiful saying: "Don't judge your day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant." From a spiritual point of view we are so grateful for the variety of seeds that we can sow. So whether it is just one tiny seed or many, cherish and celebrate the seed you sow each day.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jul-12
Thought For The Week

'We learn the rope of life by untying its knots' ~Jean Toomer

Life as we all know can be unpredictable and uncertain at the best of times. The last few months of the covid-19 pandemic have reminded us so much of this. We have had to adapt an adjust our lifestyles in ways we never thought possible. Life has been described as a shoe lace or piece of string that can get twisted in knots. Sometimes there are so many knots in our life we wonder where did it all go wrong.

From a spiritual point of view we know that knots are something we all have to live with. Even back in the time of Jesus, he was so aware of the struggles people had to face each day. Jesus was so in touch with the knots in people's lives. He reached out to them in love; he was gentle and patient with them. He most certainly did not create more knots for them and he often helped a person untie their personal knot, whatever it might have been. For that person there was a great sense of freedom and joy. The knots had been tying them down but now there were new beginnings.

It is my firm belief that every person carries knots in their personal lives. The invitation of the Gospels is to be open to the blessings that God wants to bring into our lives. God is with us very much in the here and now and is with us through every knot we may be carrying. God doesn't create the knot but God most certainly helps us untie the knot or knots. This has always been my sense of God. I believe in a God of love who is making a difference in our lives and who is helping us all untie those knots.

I will finish with the following prayer I came across called 'The Knots Prayer' and the author is unknown: Dear God, please untie the knots that are in my mind, my heart and life. Remove the 'have not', the 'cannot' and the 'do not' that I have in my mind. Erase the 'will not', 'may not' and 'might not' that may find a home in my heart. Release me from the 'could not', 'would not' and 'should not' that obstruct my life. And most of all dear God, I ask that you remove from my mind, my heart and my life all of the 'am not's that I have allowed to hold me back, especially the thought that I am not good enough. Help me to be the beautiful person you have created.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Friday
Jul-10
Thought For The Week

'Every one of us is permeated with the presence of God. Pope Francis does not have it any more than the truck driver or the nurse. Within our own hearts is this same God bursting to life in us.' ~Michael Morwood

God is closer to each of us than we can possibly ever imagine. If we look into our own hearts or into our own lives we will find God. It seems we are sometimes content to look for God elsewhere and end up disappointed.

Unfortunately some still see God as one who rewards and punishes. When things go wrong in life the explanation is that God must be testing or punishing them. Some refer to it as carrying a cross or that it must be God's will if some tragedy occurs. Such viewpoints are deeply ingrained in an old tradition that excludes love, compassion and kindness. I have even heard it being said that God has sent the covid 19 pandemic because God is angry with us.

What sort of a God gets a kick out of misfortune and in particular the misfortune of the current pandemic? It would make our belief in a loving God absurd and crazy. It would be like pushing water constantly uphill. A pointless exercise! Thankfully Jesus in our Gospels makes it quite clear that God does not punish. God is very much in the here and now and is on our side. God loves us no matter what's going on for us and God is not to be feared.

The psalm used for Sunday Mass at the weekend was psalm 144. In it the writer has a beautiful sense of the presence of God all around them. The writer gets across a sense of God who is close, personal, in the here and now and relevant in their life.

The following line stands out: "The Lord is kind and full of compassion, slow to anger, abounding in love. How good is the Lord to all, compassionate to all his creatures." We often hear the words 'fake news' today. God's love and compassion for each of us, is far from fake. We are comforted and consoled by God's presence in our lives today.

I will finish with the beautiful line and the beautiful invitation that was used in our Gospel at the weekend: "Come to me, all you who labour and are overburdened and I will give you rest."
 
 
 
  Thursday
Jul-09
Thought For The Week

'Every one of us is permeated with the presence of God. Pope Francis does not have it any more than the truck driver or the nurse. Within our own hearts is this same God bursting to life in us.' ~Michael Morwood

God is closer to each of us than we can possibly ever imagine. If we look into our own hearts or into our own lives we will find God. It seems we are sometimes content to look for God elsewhere and end up disappointed.

Unfortunately some still see God as one who rewards and punishes. When things go wrong in life the explanation is that God must be testing or punishing them. Some refer to it as carrying a cross or that it must be God's will if some tragedy occurs. Such viewpoints are deeply ingrained in an old tradition that excludes love, compassion and kindness. I have even heard it being said that God has sent the covid 19 pandemic because God is angry with us.

What sort of a God gets a kick out of misfortune and in particular the misfortune of the current pandemic? It would make our belief in a loving God absurd and crazy. It would be like pushing water constantly uphill. A pointless exercise! Thankfully Jesus in our Gospels makes it quite clear that God does not punish. God is very much in the here and now and is on our side. God loves us no matter what's going on for us and God is not to be feared.

The psalm used for Sunday Mass at the weekend was psalm 144. In it the writer has a beautiful sense of the presence of God all around them. The writer gets across a sense of God who is close, personal, in the here and now and relevant in their life.

The following line stands out: "The Lord is kind and full of compassion, slow to anger, abounding in love. How good is the Lord to all, compassionate to all his creatures." We often hear the words 'fake news' today. God's love and compassion for each of us, is far from fake. We are comforted and consoled by God's presence in our lives today.

I will finish with the beautiful line and the beautiful invitation that was used in our Gospel at the weekend: "Come to me, all you who labour and are overburdened and I will give you rest."
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jul-07
Thought For The Week

'Every one of us is permeated with the presence of God. Pope Francis does not have it any more than the truck driver or the nurse. Within our own hearts is this same God bursting to life in us.' ~Michael Morwood

God is closer to each of us than we can possibly ever imagine. If we look into our own hearts or into our own lives we will find God. It seems we are sometimes content to look for God elsewhere and end up disappointed.

Unfortunately some still see God as one who rewards and punishes. When things go wrong in life the explanation is that God must be testing or punishing them. Some refer to it as carrying a cross or that it must be God's will if some tragedy occurs. Such viewpoints are deeply ingrained in an old tradition that excludes love, compassion and kindness. I have even heard it being said that God has sent the covid 19 pandemic because God is angry with us.

What sort of a God gets a kick out of misfortune and in particular the misfortune of the current pandemic? It would make our belief in a loving God absurd and crazy. It would be like pushing water constantly uphill. A pointless exercise! Thankfully Jesus in our Gospels makes it quite clear that God does not punish. God is very much in the here and now and is on our side. God loves us no matter what's going on for us and God is not to be feared.

The psalm used for Sunday Mass at the weekend was psalm 144. In it the writer has a beautiful sense of the presence of God all around them. The writer gets across a sense of God who is close, personal, in the here and now and relevant in their life.

The following line stands out: "The Lord is kind and full of compassion, slow to anger, abounding in love. How good is the Lord to all, compassionate to all his creatures." We often hear the words 'fake news' today. God's love and compassion for each of us, is far from fake. We are comforted and consoled by God's presence in our lives today.

I will finish with the beautiful line and the beautiful invitation that was used in our Gospel at the weekend: "Come to me, all you who labour and are overburdened and I will give you rest."
 
 
 
  Monday
Jul-06
Thought For The Week

'Every one of us is permeated with the presence of God. Pope Francis does not have it any more than the truck driver or the nurse. Within our own hearts is this same God bursting to life in us.' ~Michael Morwood

God is closer to each of us than we can possibly ever imagine. If we look into our own hearts or into our own lives we will find God. It seems we are sometimes content to look for God elsewhere and end up disappointed.

Unfortunately some still see God as one who rewards and punishes. When things go wrong in life the explanation is that God must be testing or punishing them. Some refer to it as carrying a cross or that it must be God's will if some tragedy occurs. Such viewpoints are deeply ingrained in an old tradition that excludes love, compassion and kindness. I have even heard it being said that God has sent the covid 19 pandemic because God is angry with us.

What sort of a God gets a kick out of misfortune and in particular the misfortune of the current pandemic? It would make our belief in a loving God absurd and crazy. It would be like pushing water constantly uphill. A pointless exercise! Thankfully Jesus in our Gospels makes it quite clear that God does not punish. God is very much in the here and now and is on our side. God loves us no matter what's going on for us and God is not to be feared.

The psalm used for Sunday Mass yesterday was Psalm 144. In it the writer has a beautiful sense of the presence of God all around them. The writer gets across a sense of God who is close, personal, in the here and now and relevant in their life.

The following line stands out: "The Lord is kind and full of compassion, slow to anger, abounding in love. How good is the Lord to all, compassionate to all his creatures." We often hear the words 'fake news' today. God's love and compassion for each of us, is far from fake. We are comforted and consoled by God's presence in our lives today.

I will finish with the beautiful line and the beautiful invitation that was used in our Gospel yesterday: "Come to me, all you who labour and are overburdened and I will give you rest."
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jul-05
Thought For The Week

'We learn the rope of life by untying its knots' ~Jean Toomer

Life as we all know can be unpredictable and uncertain at the best of times. The last few months of the covid-19 pandemic have reminded us so much of this. We have had to adapt an adjust our lifestyles in ways we never thought possible. Life has been described as a shoe lace or piece of string that can get twisted in knots. Sometimes there are so many knots in our life we wonder where did it all go wrong.

From a spiritual point of view we know that knots are something we all have to live with. Even back in the time of Jesus, he was so aware of the struggles people had to face each day. Jesus was so in touch with the knots in people's lives. He reached out to them in love; he was gentle and patient with them. He most certainly did not create more knots for them and he often helped a person untie their personal knot, whatever it might have been. For that person there was a great sense of freedom and joy. The knots had been tying them down but now there were new beginnings.

It is my firm belief that every person carries knots in their personal lives. The invitation of the Gospels is to be open to the blessings that God wants to bring into our lives. God is with us very much in the here and now and is with us through every knot we may be carrying. God doesn't create the knot but God most certainly helps us untie the knot or knots. This has always been my sense of God. I believe in a God of love who is making a difference in our lives and who is helping us all untie those knots.

I will finish with the following prayer I came across called 'The Knots Prayer' and the author is unknown: Dear God, please untie the knots that are in my mind, my heart and life. Remove the 'have not', the 'cannot' and the 'do not' that I have in my mind. Erase the 'will not', 'may not' and 'might not' that may find a home in my heart. Release me from the 'could not', 'would not' and 'should not' that obstruct my life. And most of all dear God, I ask that you remove from my mind, my heart and my life all of the 'am not's that I have allowed to hold me back, especially the thought that I am not good enough. Help me to be the beautiful person you have created.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Friday
Jul-03
Thought For The Week

'We learn the rope of life by untying its knots' ~Jean Toomer

Life as we all know can be unpredictable and uncertain at the best of times. The last few months of the covid-19 pandemic have reminded us so much of this. We have had to adapt an adjust our lifestyles in ways we never thought possible. Life has been described as a shoe lace or piece of string that can get twisted in knots. Sometimes there are so many knots in our life we wonder where did it all go wrong.

From a spiritual point of view we know that knots are something we all have to live with. Even back in the time of Jesus, he was so aware of the struggles people had to face each day. Jesus was so in touch with the knots in people's lives. He reached out to them in love; he was gentle and patient with them. He most certainly did not create more knots for them and he often helped a person untie their personal knot, whatever it might have been. For that person there was a great sense of freedom and joy. The knots had been tying them down but now there were new beginnings.

It is my firm belief that every person carries knots in their personal lives. The invitation of the Gospels is to be open to the blessings that God wants to bring into our lives. God is with us very much in the here and now and is with us through every knot we may be carrying. God doesn't create the knot but God most certainly helps us untie the knot or knots. This has always been my sense of God. I believe in a God of love who is making a difference in our lives and who is helping us all untie those knots.

I will finish with the following prayer I came across called 'The Knots Prayer' and the author is unknown: Dear God, please untie the knots that are in my mind, my heart and life. Remove the 'have not', the 'cannot' and the 'do not' that I have in my mind. Erase the 'will not', 'may not' and 'might not' that may find a home in my heart. Release me from the 'could not', 'would not' and 'should not' that obstruct my life. And most of all dear God, I ask that you remove from my mind, my heart and my life all of the 'am not's that I have allowed to hold me back, especially the thought that I am not good enough. Help me to be the beautiful person you have created.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jul-01
'Patience, persistence and perspiration make an unbeatable combination for success.' ~Napoleon Hill

There is an old story told about a village that did not have a watchmaker. As the years went by many of the clocks became inaccurate and many of their owners decided to let them run down. But there were others, who maintained that as long as the clocks ran, they should not be abandoned. So they wound their clocks day after day even though they knew that they were not accurate. One day news spread through the village that a watchmaker had arrived. Everyone rushed to him with their clocks but the only ones that could be repaired were the ones that had been kept running. The abandoned clocks had grown so full of rust that nothing could be done with them. There are things we do too, that outwardly seem pointless and a waste of time. But in time what might seem foolish and futile now, can become precious and special. God always encourages us to patiently persist with the little and small things. With time they always add up to something of much more significance.
 
 

 

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